Reporting a situation to the Director of Youth Protection (DYP)

The information on this page is not a substitute for the information in the Act, which has official status.

Duty to Report

An adult must provide the necessary assistance to a child who wishes to report his situation or that of his brothers and sisters or of any other child (YPA, s. 42).

However, according to the YPA (ss. 39 and 39.1), the duty to report differs depending on the role of the person making the report and the situation.

  • Professionals who work with children, employees of institutions in the health and social services network, teachers, people working in a daycare and police officers:
    • When performing their duties, they:
      • Must report any situation covered by the YPA
    • When they are not performing their duties, they:
      • May report other situations where a child’s security or development might be in danger
      • Must report any situation of sexual or physical abuse. They must do so even if they consider that the parents are taking steps to put an end to the situation. The DYP will assess whether these steps are sufficient
  • Other people:
    • Must report any situation of sexual abuse or physical abuse. They must do so even if they consider that the parents are taking steps to put an end to the situation. The DYP will assess whether these steps are sufficient
    • May report other situations where a child’s security or development might be in danger

The duty to report applies even to people who are bound by professional secrecy, except lawyers who, in the practice of their profession, receive information about a situation where a child’s security or development might be in danger.

If you are not sure

You may be concerned about a child but not sure whether or not you should report the situation. If so, you can contact the DYP who will be able to answer your questions and guide you through the reporting process.

Deciding to report a child’s situation can stir up many emotions, but it is important to do it for the good of the child.

What to do if a child confides in you about a situation where the DYP is required to intervene

If a child confides in you about a situation where the DYP is required to intervene:

  • Stay calm in front of the child
  • Listen openly without judging the child
  • Be reassuring
  • Tell the child that he made the right decision by telling you about his problems
  • Assure the child that you believe him
  • Do not promise that you will keep the secret
  • Let the child speak freely, especially in cases of sexual or physical abuse. Do not ask too many questions. Your questions could influence the child and undermine the DYP’s ability to intervene
  • Write down what the child told you as soon as possible

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Last update: February 15, 2018 9:14 AM

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